Sunday, July 28, 2019

~ MMGM GOODREADS CHILDREN'S BOOKS LISTS ~

~ MARVELOUS MIDDLE-GRADE
MONDAY SPECIAL FEATURE ~
--  'GOODREADS CHILDREN'S BOOK
LISTS FROM DAYS GONE BY'  --


While conducting research for my next book, I discovered a treasure trove of children's book lists on Goodreads. The books are organized by decade, beginning with the 1920s. As I read through the list for each decade, I realized that while I have read a lot of really good children's books as a child, educator, and adult, there are still dozens and dozens of good books I haven't taken a peek at yet. 
 
The prospect of reading some beloved, but unknown to me books, fills my heart to overflowing with joy. I'd like to share a few links and highlights from these lists with you in case you'd like to add to your TBR list or select some old favorites for your students, children, or grandchildren to enjoy in this new millenium.
  
“If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all.”
Oscar Wilde 
 
“There is no friend as loyal as a book.”
Ernest Hemingway
 
“You have to write the book that wants to be written. And if the book will be too difficult for grown-ups, then you write it for children.”
Madeleine L'Engle  
 ------------------------------------------------------------- 
Here are some covers from a few of the books from each decade that I have enjoyed as a reader and as a teacher sharing books in the classroom: 
 
*1920s:

 Winnie-the-Pooh (Winnie-the-Pooh, #1)

Bambi

The Velveteen Rabbit

 Raggedy Ann Stories

621739
 -----------------------------------------------------------
*1930s:
BEST CHILDREN'S BOOKS OF THE 1930S 

Little House in the Big Woods (Little House, #1)

 Mary Poppins (Mary Poppins, #1)

 153542

 The Yearling

The Country Bunny and the Little Gold Shoes

------------------------------------------------------------
 *1940s:

BEST CHILDREN'S BOOKS OF THE 1940S 

 Make Way for Ducklings

 133526

17461

The Boxcar Children (The Boxcar Children, #1)

 183116
------------------------------------------------------------
*1950s:
 BEST CHILDREN'S BOOKS OF THE 1950S

 233093. sx318

91244

 1052804

 2426382. sx318

98573
------------------------------------------------------------
πŸ“šπŸ“•πŸ“—πŸ“˜πŸ“™πŸ“šπŸ“•πŸ“—πŸ“˜πŸ“™πŸ“š

I would love to hear about some of your old-time favorite children's books! Please take a moment to submit a comment to this blog posting telling us the titles of some treasured books from your past, or present, and feel free to include 'why' they are your favorites. Thank you, in advance, for sharing with us.
 πŸ“šπŸ“•πŸ“—πŸ“˜πŸ“™πŸ“šπŸ“•πŸ“—πŸ“˜πŸ“™πŸ“š
------------------------------------------------------------

Learn about more great middle-grade reads by visiting Greg Pattridge's 'Always in the Middle' blog to find the links to other blog posts celebrating Marvelous Middle-Grade Monday!
 
  # # # # #

8 comments:

  1. What a neat post! One older book that I enjoyed is The Door in the Wall by Marguerite de Angeli, published in 1949. It is set during the Middle Ages and revolves around a boy named Robin who planned to become a knight before his legs became nearly paralyzed. The plot was an interesting combination of low-stakes moments (much of the book was set in a monastery) and high-stakes ones (there is a giant battle at the end). It actually won the Newbery when it was published, but I think people largely forgot about it by now, even though it is quite good!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I do love The Country Bunny and the Little Gold Shoes--quite the feminist manifesto, really! I find that older titles do not hold up very well with my students. There is always something, like making fun of a character because he is fat in "The House with a Clock in Its Walls" or racial stereotypes in A Cricket in Times Square that make older titles something I don't always want to hand to young readers no matter how much I liked them. The Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler holds up pretty well... except for the "Mrs.". which I refuse to use in real life! Great post.

    ReplyDelete
  3. One of the books I remember finding at a neighbor's yard sale when I was a boy. My side of the Mountain. I must have read that book a half dozen times. Thanks for the list. What a great resource. When time allows I'll be going back to read some of these titles.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I've read many of the books you mentioned in my youth. One of my favorites was Snow Treasure by Marie McSwigan, which may have been published in the late 1950s or 1963. It is about how the children of Norway helped sneak Norway's gold out of the country when the Nazi's arrive. Every day the sled past the Germans with gold bars beneath them and then build snowmen with the gold buried beneath. My first introduction to WWII. I also was a huge fan of Pippi Longstocking.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I loved Shadow Castle by M. Cockrell published in 1968. I still have it.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I was wrong. It was published in 1946.

    ReplyDelete
  7. What a fun post. I remember many of these fondly. Thanks for the walk down memory lane.

    ReplyDelete
  8. From Alicia Haney:

    Hi, I loved this post, lots of oldies but goodies!

    ReplyDelete

~ FRIDAY FICTION FEATURE THE EARL'S LADY GEOLOGIST ~

  ~ FRIDAY FICTION FEATURE ~   --  'THE EARL'S LADY GEOLOGIST'  -- AUTHOR ALISSA BAXTER ~Post Includes:  Book Spotlight + Excerp...